Skip to main content

About your Search

20130126
20130203
STATION
FOXNEWS 16
CSPAN 11
MSNBCW 11
CSPAN2 10
MSNBC 10
FBC 9
CNN 7
CNNW 7
KQED (PBS) 3
WHUT (Howard University Television) 3
KRCB (PBS) 2
KPIX (CBS) 1
WETA 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 111
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 111 (some duplicates have been removed)
the press" conversation. this week a focus on foreign policy. it didn't get much attention in the president's inaugural address, but as his second term is underway, there's certainly a lot of focus on some of the big areas that he will be occupied by when it comes to national security and the world. what are some of the big bets that president obama can make to cement his legacy abroad? joining me is martin indyk of the brookings institution, an assistant secretary of state for president clinton and also the author of "bending history, barack obama's foreign policy." i got to take part in a conversation of big bets, black swans, a presidential briefing where you and the team at brookings write about both some of the real dangers in foreign policy as well as some areas where the president can make an impact if he so chooses. there's a lot to digest including the fact a new secretary of state is going to be presumably confirmed by the senate, john kerry. and yet in the financial times as we do this interview it is hillary clinton and the questions she faced about the death of our ambassador a
in washington. the writing has appeared in "the new york times," "politico," foreign policy and washington monthly among others. they came to us last night from virginia, took a late night train and what i'd like to do is turn it over to you for your thoughts and comments to start off. >> thank you very much. i'm going to start for us today. let me thank you much for hosting us to thank you for coming. it's an honor pleasure and we look forward to nature scene discussion today. i'm going to start with two provocative themes from our new book, "going to tehran: why the united states must come to terms with the islamic republic of iran". the first of these means, and these two get at the heart of our book. the united states is today enhanced and for the past two years a power and relative decline in the middle east. the second core team as the biggest beneficiary of american ongoing decline in the middle east is the islamic republic of iran. if you're not sure you agree with these propositions, i want to ask you to compare the relative position of the united states and the islamic republic o
of the first administration's foreign policy and hillary clinton's tenure at state and i think the defining external event to the administration of foreign policy has been the arab spring, obviously, and all that uncorked and how to manage that. but before we get to that, we still have robin on satellite. i want to talk about the relationship between the president and hillary clinton and the degree to which the legacy of foreign policy in the first term has been hillary clinton's legacy and the degree to which it really has been -- the shots have been called from the white house because a lot of reporting on this has been very interesting. tonight there's going to be an interview on "60 minutes" that's a joint interview between the president and hillary clinton, a joint exit interview, and this is what the president had to say about hillary clinton's legacy. >> hillary will go down as one of the finest secretary of states we've had. it has been a great collaboration over the last four years. i'm going to miss her. i wish she was sticking around. but she has logged in so many miles i can't b
in american foreign policy in the late 1940s. if -- >> like when -- >> if there are two people that would get it. if this is a real deal, what you say, with talk radio -- >> i think it is. >> moving on this issue, and i think the bill -- >> let's also keep in mind that the democrats are trying to turn texas blue. there is work afoot to capitalize on the demographic question here. >> jody, this is my question. i feel like we're -- this is a big moment for the republican party in terms of brand and also policy. i haut this was an incredible moment when jim demint is asked about the comments that colin powell made about a dark vein of intolerance, the racism within the republican party, and also republican comments on legitimate rape and this is how jim demint, who is now president or incoming president of the heritage foundation, presumably a leading voice among conservatives, this is his answer. >> do you regret some of the comments about abortion, about rape. again, what colin powell were vailed racist comments from the party. >> david, the fact that we are losing over 3,000 unborn children a
of a foreign service officer. learning about foreign-policy around the dinner table each night to this service in combat -- his service in combat in vietnam. less well known is the story of this foreign policy work inside dissonant. -- the senate. his 90 overseas trips that he made in 28 years on foreign relations committee, his work to ensure free elections in the philippines, his work with aids in africa, his work as chairman of the new start treaty and his very public and successful diplomatic intervention in afghanistan, pakistan, and sudan. historians will judged his senate years on his impact on foreign policy much the same way so many people recognized ted kennedy's impact on domestic policy. from his many years in the u.s. senate, he has developed a very personal understanding that we represent not just states or governments, but also people. i once asked john why he loves the senate. he said it is the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he has been working quietly to help a father from massachusetts, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to
. afghanistan, there's no guarantee of the future. these are -- the foreign policy record, especially as it relates to terrorism, is not much of a record. >> and caryn, you've been covering the foreign policy as well as the domestic policy. this "60 minutes" interview, the joint interview, was pretty extraordinary on the face of it, but as we enter this last week of hillary clinton's tenure, the president is basically saying, you know, thank you, thank you, thank you for everything you've done. >> yeah. and she has been i think in many ways -- there are not a lot of sort of big monumental tangible accomplishments of her tenure as secretary of state. in many ways she was successful as much because of what she represented, but the history of second terms is that foreign policy becomes much more important, that presidents travel more, that they often engage more with the rest of the world, and i think that given the set of events we're looking at overseas, that is very likely to be the case of president obama's second term. foreign policy almost wasn't even almost mentioned in this elect
on here, willie? >> they didn't break any new foreign policy ground, that was clear, in terms of the questioning. so then you're left to wonder what was going on there? what was the idea? although it was remarkable to see the two of them sitting together if you thought about where we were five years ago and them saying shame on you and you're likeable enough. >> you're a racist. >> andrea mitchell, am i being too cynical this morning? because these are two people i respect a great deal. >> a great deal. >> well, it was sort of -- as you're pointing out, it was really unusual to see them together. and to see the relationship that they have developed, i think that they have developed a close relationship. i was really intrigued by when he -- when steve kroft asked about what about the staffs, and they acknowledged it took longer for their staffs to get over the hurt and anger after the campaign, and i would say still hasn't happened, exactly. because she has been the most celebrated secretary of state and certainly the most high-profile member of the cabinet. and gets along very
. >> that's only if you think 80,000 people dead is not ugly. yes, sir. adding a mac >> foreign-policy and especially security systems. this is another area where congress really has a role to play. the administration is basically decided that mohamed morsi at egypt is the new mubarak. the guy in the seat we will now help. it's completely indifferent to what our aid program should look like and what the desired outcome and egypt should be. the only thing they appear to be interested in is the continuation of the israeli egyptian camp david accords, which are obviously of great interest, but not really the only thing they should animate us and we talk about the largest country in the middle east. when i thought we were delivering fighter jets to the egyptian military, i just asked myself, what message does this send? the rule should be not the foreign aid is bad and not that foreign aid is good and not that military assistance is good or bad, it is the u.s. taxpayer dollar used to further u.s. tax your interest and every time a new government comes into power, we should take that aid do
the president was challenged on his administration's foreign policy. >> the biggest criticism of this team and the u.s. foreign policy from your political opposition has been what they say an abductation of the united states on the world's stage. sort of a reluctance to become involved in another entanglement, or what appears to be an unwillingness to gauge big issues. >> well, muammar gadhafi probably does not agree with that assessment. skwoo what is the obama doctrine? we will discuss coming up next. [ male announcer ] red lobster is hitting the streets to tell real people about our new 15 under $15 menu! oh my goodness... oh my gosh, this looks amazing... [ male announcer ] 15 entrees under $15! it's our new maine stays! seafood, chicken, and more! ooh! the tilapia with roasted vegetables. i'm actually looking at the wood grilled chicken with portobello wine sauce. that pork chop was great. no more fast food friday's. we're going to go to red lobster... [ male announcer ] come try our new menu and sea food differently. and introducing 7 lunch choices for just $7.99! salad, sandwiches a
.s. will have a drone -- we will discuss the foreign policy strategy or lack thereof just ahead. [ bells jingle ] [ cash register dings ] [ male announcer ] wow. a brave choice. okay, focus. think courage. think shaun white. think how perfect they'll be for outdoor crafts. mr. white. [ male announcer ] they're good for circulation. plus, they're totally practical. yeah, freedom. scan me. stride on, pale-legged, short-shorts guy. ♪ yeah, i'm looking to save, but i'm not sure which policy is right for me. you should try our coverage checker. it helps you see if you have too much coverage or not enough, making it easier to get what you need. [ beeping ] these are great! [ beeping ] how are you, um, how are you doing? i'm going to keep looking over here. probably a good idea. ken: what's a good idea? nothing. with coverage checker, it's easy to find your perfect policy. visit progressive.com today. >> in his 60 minute side-by-side interview with secretary clinton the president was challenged on his administration's foreign policy. >> the biggest criticism of this team and the u.s. foreign policy
, our foreign policy was not going to be defined solely by iraq; that we were going to be vigilant about terrorism, but we were going to make sure that we deployed all elements of american power-- diplomacy, our economic and cultural and social capital-- in order to bring about the kinds of international solutions that we wanted to see. i had confidence that hillary could do that. and, you know, one of the things that i will always be grateful for is... yeah, it wasn't just that she and i had to integrate. i mean, we had bob gates, who was a holdover from the bush administration, you know, leon panetta to take over the c.i.a., and so we had a lot of very strong personalities around the table. you know, i think one of the things that hillary did was establish a standard in terms of professionalism and teamwork in our cabinet, in our foreign policy making that said "we're going to have an open discussion, we're going to push each other hard; there are going to be times where we have some vigorous disagreements. once the president makes a decision, though, we're going to go out there and ex
croft was pointing out in the interview, saying they had no major foreign policy accomplishments, major ones, that is, that they could hold high was his question in the first four years. will that change for kerry? will that be different in this second term with hillary clinton gone? >> i think there are some openings for the obama administration that weren't there in the first four years. you know, we're out of iraq. we're going to be out of afghanistan, our troops out of afghanistan at the end of next year. i think there are going to be some foreign policy challenges with iran and syria and libya and who knows where. and maybe a little bit more of an opening for foreign policy. we also know that presidents in their second term, they tend to turn to foreign policy in those final two years when it is so hard to get things through congress. so i would say, you know, and he's got a secretary of state who's very experienced in john kerry and who also has a relationship with barack obama. >> is there anything he can't do now that secretary clinton will be -- again, friday is her last day. w
on this complex issue. robert kagn is a center fellow of the united states and european foreign policy of the brookings institution. his most recent book "the world america made" has been published and dr. kagan also serves as a member of secretary clinton's foreign policy board soon to be senator kerry's policy board and writes a monthly column on a world affairs from "the washington post" and the weekly standard and the new republic. joshua landis is the director of the center for middle east studies and this is the professor at the university of oklahoma. he writes a daily newsletter on syrian policy that attract some 200,000 pages a month. is really one of the most thoughtful blogs today on a which really dives into the crisis and syria. current the vice president for the new initiatives and the distinguished scholar at the woodrow wilson institute at national center for scholars in washington, d.c. they can have another great president. for nearly to nearly two decades has served the secretaries of state and advisers in the middle east bureau, negotiating middle east peace which w
on the jihadization for a policy under obama? i said, ma'am, with all due respect, president obama's foreign policy is an extension of president bush's foreign policy. if there's any difference at all, president obama is killing more people overseas than president bush ever did. so, no, i don't think there's any difference between the bush foreign policy and the obama foreign policy, which i think is a shame. there was a wonderful opportunity to take a different path and to reclaim our position as a moral leader in the world. i am disappointed in that. with regard to john brennan, i've known him since 1990. i worked directly for john brennan twice. i think he is a terrible choice to lead the cia. i think it is time for the cia to move beyond the ugliness of the post-september 11 regime, and we need someone who is going to respect the constitution and not be bogged down by a legacy of torture. i think president obama's upon of john brennan sends the message to all americans. >> you worked with him, directly for him. did he receive internal updates regularly about the torture techniques including wat
has made haiti one of the top foreign policy projects, helping the impoverished island build back better after the devastating earthquake that killed over a quarter million people. in no small measure has her husband -- president clinton -- been a part of that attempt at restoration of haiti from that devastating earthquake. last week during secretary clinton's final appearance before the senate foreign relations committee, she said -- and i quote -- "every time that blue and white airplane carrying the words "united states of america" touches down in some far-off capital, i feel again the honor it is to represent the world's indispensable nation. madam secretary, you have truly honored us with your indispensable leadership. and on behalf of all of our senate colleagues, we want to thank you for your extraordinary service to this country. and i want to say that your position will be in capable hands with our colleague and your former colleague, senator john kerry, who will serve as we confirm him in the next 24 hours as the 68th secretary of state. senator kerry has served in this
think this speech given last night by this president represents the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since the vietnam. if it is carried out, i will resist it." the question continued on for months and months talking about what a disaster the surge would be even when it was clear the surge was succeeding. in march 2008, you said "the term quagmires could apply. some reject that term, but if that is not a quagmire, what is? even as late as august 29, 2011, in an interview with the "financial times" -- you said i disagree with president obama and his decision to surge in iraq as i did with president obama. do you stand by those comments? >> senator, i stand by them because i made them. >> were you right? where you write in your assessment? >> i would defer to the judgment of history to assert -- to sort that out. >> the committee deserves to know whether you are right or wrong about the search. >> i will explain why -- >> i want to know if you are right or wrong. it's a direct question. >> the surge assisted in the objective. >> will you please answer the questi
. prosecutors say he was motivated by fame and money. president obama has named a longtime foreign policy aide to be his next white house chief of staff. the president described him as a close friend not afraid to deliver a straight talk. mr. obamas said he played a key role in every national security decision of his administration. in northern mali, islamist militants destroyed when a strategic bridge. it is the bridge that thousands of african troops were planning to use to reinforce the battle against the rebels. even as the french-led military operation gathered strength, there are warnings of a humanitarian crisis. 350,000 people have been uprooted by the violence. we have this report from the central town. >> they may be hundreds of miles away from home, but these children still find a reason to play. 10 months ago, their family was forced to flee their home. armed militants were threatening them. the workforce in the women to cover their faces. this young unmarried woman says she was taken away and interrogated after she dared to speak to a male neighbor. >> they came and put their guns
this week's press pass conversation with vice president and director for foreign policy at the brookings institute, martin indyk, on some of the big bets president obama is making during his second term in foreign policy. that's on meetthepress@msnbc.com. we'll be back next week. if it's sunday, it's "meet the press." >>> weapons have no place. >> people need to feel safe. >>> more than six weeks since newtown and the gun debate takes center stage in d.c. you are watch msnbc. we will talk to connecticut senator about what is realistically going to get done. plus president obama sits down with hispanic caucus leaders to talk about immigration reform. congress woman sanchez was one at the meeting. >>> she is packing up and moving out and heading home. what is next for hillary clinton? we will check in with one of the long-time residents of hillary land. president obama is urging gun control advocates to listen to voices of americans who grew up hunting. if you grew up and your dad gave you a hunting rifle when you were ten and that became part of your family's traditions you would see why
that the surge would be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam. were up correct or incorrect yes or no? >> my reference to. >> the question is were you right or wrong? that's a pretty straight-forward question. i would like the answer whether you were right or wrong and then you are free to elaborate. >> i wanted to say that that guy was almost president but he wasn't even almost president. >> he's president of the surge. >> he's president of the surge, and he is a grumpy old man. john kerry got a free pass up there. he's a democratic. chuck hagel's just getting lambasted. he's a republican, a colleague. how is this happened? >> he's perceived as a threat to the idea of what the republicans have stood for. here you have a guy who's saying a lot of things that democrats have said, a lot of things frankly that progressives have said. whether he is a progressive, that's a big question. i don't think chuck hagel is a progressive, but he's been saying a lot of those things. the problem is he is a republican voice saying those things so he is obviously a bigger threat
? were you correct or incorrect when you said the surge would be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam? correct or incorrect? yes or no? >> my reference to the -- >> are you going answer the question, senator hagel? were you right or wrong? >> the nominee said the quote referred to his feelings about the iraq war in general, not just the surge. he took heat for his work with global zero, group which says it's committed to eliminating all nuclear weapons globally. hagel was asked if he's anti-american nukes. >> the position of global zero, my position, some of the individuals national security leaders talked about including himself, has never been unilateral disarmament. never. ever. >> hagel backtracked on the comment about the political power of the "jewish lobby." >> i should have used another term. i'm sorry. i regret it. >> the use of intimidation, i should have used influence. i think it would have been more appropriate. >> coming in the hearing, hagel were controversial nominee. a number of senators on both sides said it was uncomfortable bei
with cutbacks to the u.s. stockpile as a means to draw russia into negotiations, foreign policy magazine reported, ahead of the unannounced discussions. the house subcommittee chairman mike rogers asks if they have assurances as to what is going on there. i would note that last year's defense authorization villepin -- bill calls for briefings on his discussions to the congress, the servant -- the armed services committee and subcommittee. it does not less than twice each year, the president or his designee will brief the committee on foreign relations and the committee on armed services about the dialogue between the u.s. and the russian federation on issues of limits or controls of nuclear arms, missile defense system, and long-range conventional strike systems. the deadline for that would be march 2 this year. my first question to you, if confirmed, will you honor that request as part of the mdaa? >> the request for the briefing? >> yes, the requirements for the briefing. will you keep congress advise on any discussions dealing with national defense and dialogue with russia on national
with the mainstream of u.s. foreign and defense policy and also with president obama. chuck hagel believes we must preserve the american strength as a force for good in the world. he recognizing that protecting our interests requires strong allies and friends, as well as strong american leadership. third, chuck has the depth of experience and leadership skills required to handle this tough job. there is no shortage of security challenges around the world, as this committee knows and as you enumerated this morning, mr. chairman. a very large and impressive group of former cabinet officials and public servants from both sides of the aisle have said that they trust chuck hagel with this important responsibility. and i strongly, i strongly agree. fourth, on the fiscal side, i am will be athat chauck powerful advocate for a common- sense approach in this administration and on capitol hill regarding fiscal challenges to the defense budget. he understands that our defense capabilities are being threatened on two budget friends. first, sequestration, with its damaging, across the board, up from the budget
may approach foreign policy and national security in his second term. and in a little less than an hour and a half, a cato institute forum on the state of libertarianism. >> several live events to tell you about today. the georgetown university law center hosts a forum with campaign staff members and representatives of interest groups who will focus on how lessons of last year's campaign will affect legislation in the new congress. that's on c-span at 11 a.m. eastern. and here on c-span2 at 1 p.m., we're covering an atlantic council discussion on the situation in mali. >> john mccain's 2000 campaign when he ran for president is the most memorable campaign. i mean, of any that i've ever covered or been around. i mean, it was just -- we'll never, we'll never see it again. i mean, here he was, you know, facing george w. bush who had all the face cards of the republican party backing him, and the three republican governors in new hampshire and all the money, and john mccain went out and held 114 town meetings, and he stayed there until every or question was answered. and you'd see p
. was that a mistake? >> i don't think that was a mistake. if you look at the overarching ark of our foreign policy, democrats had a sizeable advantage over republicans on the issues of foreign policy and keeping us safe. hillary clinton played a large role in that. if you look at -- i agree with you on the arab spring. got only knows what that is going to turn into. if you look at getting rid of gadhafi, and a large role in whether or not she runs for president because americans don't pay that much attention to foreign policy. >> if she's healthy, given the blood cloth and concussion, if she's healthy, do you think there's any doubt that she's still thinking about being the first woman as president of the united states? >> i have no idea what is in her head. she's certainly a strong institution of the democratic party, certainly stronger than joe biden does. the foreign policy will loom large. we'll ask the question, so what did the obama administration's afghanistan surge accomplish exactly? they sent tens and thousands of additional troops, spent a lot of money. we are going to be out of afghani
dangerous foreign policy blunter in this country since vietnam. were you correct or incorrect? yes or no? >> my reference to the -- >> senator hagel -- >> well, if you would like me to explain, why -- >> well, i actually would like an answer. yes or no. >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no. i think it's far more complicated than that. >> name one person in your opinion who is intimidated by the israeli lobby in the united states senate. >> well, first -- >> name one. >> i don't know. >> well, why would you say it? >> i didn't have in mind a specific person. >> perry, republicans in what you're hearing in washington, d.c. proud of the performance they demonstrated yesterday? >> this is a very unusual hearing. usually when an ex senator comes to be nominated for something, his former colleagues treat him nicely. hillary clinton had that, john kerry had that. very striking yesterday. the republicans, they seemed very happy to, you know, pile on a really sharply attack chuck hagel. you saw roy blunt come out today and say he's not voting for this nominee. you saw the republicans be
american foreign policy. but what are the high points? what can she point to to say i did that during tenure as secretary of state? >> the reality is she was trapped in a way, caught between an a cruel and unforgiving world which is not terribly hospitable to big successes, and she didn't have any. on the other hand, she was caught with a foreign policy president, barack obama, who's the most withholding and controlling since richard nixon. he wasn't going to delegate many of the big-ticket items. i think shea made it out of necessity. she identified her own issues. i call them planetary humanism -- women's issues, gend gender issues, social networking, internet freedoms, press freedoms. they're all very important, 21st century issue, but they're not the kind of issues that get you into the secretary of state hall of fame. a very fine secretary of state nonetheless. >> and the benghazi, libya, situation will follow her, yes? >> absolutely. >> yeah. polls show she is one of the most admired women if not the most admired woman in the world. is she the front-runner for the white house in
, the unrest taking place in egypt right now. clinton stood by one of the most consciousal foreign policy decisions the administration made that gets little little -- the ouster of mubarak. she responded to the head of the army who said that the state could fall part. >> that would lead to incredible chaos and violence on a scale that would be devastating for egypt and the region. >> clinton also commented on the russia reset. once perceived as a foreign policy success now has erode the to the point the russians won't even let american families adopt russian children. >> i think we just have to wait and see what the real objectives of the new russian leadership are. we thought it was self-defeating for them to take the actions they did, throwing out usaid. that hurts the russian people. i thought it was tragic that they stopped adoptions, especially those that were already in train. so there are issues. we will keep working on them, but we'll also draw lines where we disagree and seek out when we must. >> interesting she referred to it as they. we know when all this changed, when putin go
of a foreign-policy think tank. at his confirmation hearing today, he had some back and forth with former colleagues, including senator john mccain. that exchange is about an hour and a half into the hearing. later, we will get your thoughts about the nomination and hearing on our phone lines at 11:00 p.m. eastern, 8:00 pacific. carl levin chairs the armed services committee and makes the opening statement. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> good morning, everybody. the committee meets today to consider the nomination of former senator chuck hagel to be secretary of defense. before i begin, i want to first welcome senator inhofe as the new ranking republican on our committee, succeeding senator mccain. senator mccain has been a great partner over the past six years, and i thank him for all the work he has done to get bills enacted, his leadership on a host of issues, his support for the work of this committee, and for always keeping our hearings likely. -- lively. senator inhofe has shown his strong commitmen
on this, jenna. in barack obama you have the most controlling and withholding foreign policy president since richard nixon. barack obama doesn't dell gate. he dominates. and i think both chuck hagel and john kerry may well have to get used to the fact on the big issues, and it should be the president ultimately who makes the big decisions but consequential and effective secretaries of defense and secretaries of state help shape the policy. and that really remains to be seen. in an obama second term. jenna: let's go bigger if we can for a moment. because the questions about the president's relationship with israel, again are one ally in this region, have been a constant questioning over the last four years. now we're going to be in a new term. regardless what happens with senator hagel and whether or not he heads up the pentagon which is expected, what do you i think the damage is of those questioning of our administration and our loyalty to our ally? >> well, i think the reality is if barack obama, and again, this a two-way street. benjamin netanyahu is not an easy guy to get along wit
of the foreign-policy choices facing this country. and today we are continuing what we have come to call secretary of state week here in the council. on tuesday night we were fortunate to hear from george shultz, who served as secretary of state for some six and a half years under president ronald reagan. and this afternoon we are honored to host hillary rodham clinton. during her last 24 hours as president obama's first president obama's first secretary of state and immediately afterwards and told she might be expected to party like it's cartagena all over again. [laughter] we did a research and this is the eighth time that hillary clinton has spoken at the council and her third appearance in and her current incarnation as secretary of state. this afternoon speech is probably the most anticipated one she has given here and indeed it may be the most anticipated farewell address since 1796. [laughter] i suspect though that her views on untangling alliances might be somewhat different than george washington's. much has been made of the mile she has put in as the country's 67 secretary of s
night by this president represents the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam if it is carried out. i will resist it. and you talk about what disaster the search would become even to the point where it was clear the surge was succeeding. in 2008, you said you hear the term quagmire, which could apply. if that is not a quagmire, then what is approved even as late as august 29, 2011, in an interview -- 2011 -- in an interview with the financial times, you said i disagreed with the president, president obama, his decision on iraq as i did with president bush on the surge in iraq. do you stand by those comments? >> i stand by them because i made them. i will explain why. >> i want to know if you bore right or wrong. >> the search assisted in the objective, but if we review their record -- >> will you please into the question. where you correct when he said the surge would be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder since the a number of words you incorrect or correct? >> my reference -- and not argue not answering the question? the question was argue right
the understanding of the world of the foreign policy choices facing this country. today we are continuing what we have come to call secretary of state we cure the council. on tuesday night we were fortunate to hear from george shultz, who served as secretary of state for some six and a half years under president ronald reagan. and this afternoon we are honored to host hillary rodham clinton. during her last 24 hours as president obama's for secretary of state, immediately afterwards i'm told she might be expected to party like it's cartagena all over again. [laughter] we did our research and this is the eighth time that hillary clinton has spoken at the council and her third appearance in her current incarnation as secretary of state. and his afternoon speech is probably the most anticipated one she has given here and it may be the most anticipated farewell address since 1796. [laughter] i suspect though that her views on entangling alliances might be somewhat different than george washington's. much as been made of the mile she has put in as the country 67 secretary of state. you have seen a sta
hearing these. >> if she wants this job, it will be interesting. on foreign policy, president obama defending himself from critics who say the u.s. has not been aggressive enough in using american power abroad. >>> well, moammar gadhafi probably does not agree with that assessment, or at least if he were around he would not agree with that assessment. when it comes to egypt, if it had not been for the leadership we showed, you might have seen a different outcome there. but also understanding that we do nobody a service when we leap before we look. here is a classic example of where our involvement, we want to make sure that not only does it enhance u.s. security but also that it is doing right by the people of syria and neighbors like israel that are going to be profoundly affected by it. and so it's true sometimes that we don't just shoot from the hip. >>> secretary clinton's last day at the state department will be this friday. >>> we have new developments on immigration reform. a bipartisan group of eight senators say they've reached an agreement on sweeping legislation that incl
of the president's state of the union address and how foreign and defense policy will be handled. then senator kirsten gillibrand discusses bipartisan safety legislation. later, former representative gabrielle giffords on gun violence. >> on thursday, a hearing on u.s. workers and retirement savings. live coverage from the senate health education and labor and pynchon's committee. that is live thursday at 10:00 a.m. eastern on c-span3. >> we are the best country in the world. what a marvelously stupid thing to say. of all the countries in the world, pretty good. what we have to believe that we are the best? what does that mean? and once we have to assert it all of this time? what does it mean to other people? american products go around the world, so you are observed by people in every corner of the world. and we teach them not to like us. gratuitously. >> randall robinson, taking your calls, e-mail, facebook comments, and tweets. sunday at noon eastern on book tv on c-span2. >> president obama is set to deliver the state of the union. a discussion on how foreign policy and national security i
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 111 (some duplicates have been removed)